We arrived in beautiful old St. Augustine, Florida on Friday afternoon. Everything for the next few hours was a whirlwind of face-to-face meetings.

I’ll add more details later, but for now, here’s a sunset over the hotel image.

StAugustineFriNight

A few years back a good friend patiently explained something to me. “There are two parts to becoming a published author. One is the craft of writing and the other is the business of writing. They are two entirely different skillsets.” He was quite right.

These days, the business of self publishing not only includes reading the fine print, but also preparing your book so that it can be easily read on multiple devices. The problem is that authors are the unwilling pawns in a war between the media distribution giants. Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Apple, and other companies require totally different formats for their books. The reasoning is simple. They want to be your only source for new reading matter on their proprietary devices.

If you are going to self publish, then you will need to convert your original document into four or five totally different formats. While this can seem intimidating, it’s really not that difficult.

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Multiplarity

The famous science fiction author, Vernor Vinge’ has been credited with originating the term singularity.

From Wikipedia, we have this, “…his 1993 essay “The Coming Technological Singularity”, in which he argues that the creation of superhuman artificial intelligence will mark the point at which “the human era will be ended,” such that no current models of reality are sufficient to predict beyond it.”

Both the term and related concepts have been further advanced with a series of books and lectures by Ray Kurzweil.

Although I believe this rapture of the nerds will occur, I don’t think it will be the all-encompassing revolution that these futurists predict. As my friends and fans know, I’m a history buff, and this allows one to take a wider view of things.

Just as today, there are those of you, reading this on some sort of screen that is driven with micro-electronics, at this same instant, at other places around the world, there are semi-literate people who’s very existence depends on herding animals. A deeper search can still reveal naked humans, armed with blowguns and arrows, living a hunter-gatherer lifestyle that would have been familiar to a Neanderthal.
Just as we have very intelligent and well-read people in the United States that are totally aware of the benefits of high-technology and yet choose a simpler lifestyle, I believe the future will not be a singularity, but rather, a multiplarity.

That is the universe I have depicted in the Multiplarity Trilogy. The first book sets the stage when humans finally break the tyranny of disease and death itself. As one would imagine, this sudden change in the way we view ourselves isn’t painless. But it does show a way around some of our current issues. Unfortunately, every solution comes with a brand-new set of problems.

The second book, Selenaphiles, deals with some of the basic problems of establishing an off-Earth colony. This became much more of a world-building exercise than I had originally planned. I’m a bit picky about the technological items in my stories. They all have to have some basis in current scientific research and prototypes. The inflatable structures of Bigelow Aerospace that I’ve described in both Omniphage and Selenaphiles, are in fact quite real and are undergoing orbital testing at this time.

Next week, we’ll take a look at some of the space travel hardware described in the Multiplarity Trilogy.

Click this to read An Author’s Journey: Part Three

Although I’ve written and published more than a dozen urban fantasy titles over the past six years, the core elements of the Multiplarity Space Opera Trilogy has been more than ten years in the making. I think the time has come to document at least part of this journey, keeping in mind the old adage, if you can’t serve as an good example, perhaps you’ll do as a warning. We shall start with the first book, Omniphage.

In the Beginning

Several of the core concepts have been bouncing around the back of my head for many years. It wasn’t until about four years ago, that they started to come together. Like many of my longer works, I began with a short story that was, inspired by a photograph or a fantasy image I saw online. Steven Stahlberg is an incredible 2D and 3D artist. Check out some of his work at: http://www.androidblues.com

He also has a FaceBook presence. https://www.facebook.com/steven.stahlberg.7

Several of his images stick in my mind, but one of his old 2D drawings of a Cat and Mouse in a film noir setting, got me thinking.  http://www.androidblues.com/gallery/catandmouse.jpg

What if they were real people in our modern society? What would cause them to look like that?
About the same time, I read about some genetics research that was experimenting with nanotechnology in the search for a cancer cure. I had to start writing.

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Echopharte!

October 31, 2012

The forth book in a five book shifter series from Red Rose Publishing, Echopharte tells of the origins and evolution of the shifters.

The ancients revered them. The colonists feared them. Today, no one believes in them. Shifters have lived and worked among humans since before recorded history.

Echopharte tells of the first community and how both good and evil have continuously shaped our society, from ancient times up to the present day.

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Omniphage is Live!

October 28, 2012

After more than two years of work, the first novel in the Multiplarity trilogy has been released.

It is available from Barnes & Noble and Amazon right now.

If anyone has questions or would like to discuss this tale, feel free in chatting me up on Yahoo Messenger or Google Messenger.

Omniphage Cover Art

October 14, 2012

We are getting ready to release Omniphage, the first novel in a science fiction trilogy. I’m proud to present the front and back cover art.

Omniphage Front Cover
This is what will show as both an eBook and trade paperback front cover.

The lower image will be the back cover for the trade paperback release.

I want to thank my critique crew for a lot of valuable feedback. The cover art has gone through a lot of changes since the first concepts arose, more than a year ago.

For the record, this was developed using Inkscape and GIMP.

Omniphage Back Cover

Olde City, New Blood!

June 17, 2012

I just found out about an upcoming event that should be a lot of fun.

There is going to be a gathering of Urban Fantasy and Romance authors and readers in St. Augustine, Florida this coming February eighth to the tenth.

http://oldecitynewblood.wordpress.com/

Details are a bit sparce at this point, but I’ll post updates on my plans as soon as possible.

Hope y’all can join us for the party.

Autograph vs Signature

April 30, 2012

The majority of people assume an autograph is the same as a signature. There are some very important differences.

A legal signature can be anything at all and does not have to be legible. As long as you sign all your legal documents in the same general manner, it is binding in a court of law.

An autograph on the other hand, must be legible enough to satisfy your fans and it should not be confused with your signature.

As a case in point, a fan may hand you a pretty document and in your rush to get to an appointment, you might just scribble your name. If you autograph it as if it were a book jacket, that shows you were there in your celebrity persona. If that document happens to be an agent agreement or power-of-attorney contract, it can easily be argued that you did not legally sign it.

On the other hand, if you use the same signature for both legal documents and fan collectibles, you may one day find yourself in a tight spot.

Consider as well, that an autograph should be fairly quick and easy to create. That is why an aspiring author should practice it regularly. After all, once you’re famous, you’ll find yourself facing a horde of adoring fans at the next convention and won’t have time to think about it.

Good luck and be sure to pace yourself to avoid writer’s cramp.

The following quote is from a recent post on SFSignal.com:

“In college, I had a renowned creative writing professor try to convince me to stop writing “genre” fiction and put my talents to better use. My answer to him was to ask why I would give up writing something I loved for something I had no interest in?”

Now this makes so much sense to me. I have read a great deal and for relaxation, much prefer genre fiction.

Click this for the full article.

I’ve been dissed by the ‘real literature’ snobs on more than one occasion.

What do you think?